Susquehanna River Flathead Catfish – how to fillet a catfish

 

Flathead Catfish

Flathead Catfish

This morning about 4:30am I got a text from Chris asking if I wanted catfish that he and Wayne went night fishing on the Susquehanna River. My first text back was no, simply because, it’s not worth the mess in my kitchen with only a few catfish. Last time he and Wayne brought me catfish there was 4 fish all under 22″, to me, that isn’t worth the effort although I appreciated what they did bring me.

Then, I got another text about 5:30am asking me again this time with a picture. LOL (these guys are learning I tell ya)

I knew right away these catfish were alot bigger than last time and a bunch more to boot. So I text back saying ok bring them over. Glad I did.

Total there was 3 catfish – 32″ , 3 catfish – 34″ ,  2 catfish – 21″ and 1 catfish – 31″ all fillet up real nice and clean. I do wish I had a scale though to weigh some of those suckers .. or even to weigh the total fillets after finished. Darn it. (I was to lazy to use the bathroom scale – lol)

Flathead Catfish

Flathead Catfish

I think catfish are easy to fillet because they lay flat (that’s prolly how they get their name Flathead catfish – lol – joking) But they are alot easier than say like brown trout, bass and salmon. I fillet alot of fish from these two guys, now that I think about it. Ha Ha

To fillet fish is simple really, just makes a mess in your kitchen. The hardest and most time consuming is getting the fish on and off the cutting board. To fillet the fish is fast.

I run my finger down the back (on the right) of the catfish head till I feel muscle, then poke my knife tip in till I hit bone. Slice threw the skin all the way to about the last inch or so before the tail fin keeping pressure on the knife against the spine. Use your thumb in the slit to feel around and guide your other hand working the knife.

Then, below the back of the head (where I put the knife tip in) cut downward on an angle till you hit the ribs. Should look like a loose triangle shaped hunk of meat. Don’t cut it off – take the knife tip and (starting at the spine area) lightly slide threw the meat to ribcage all the way down – you want the knife tip to slide between the red meat (ribcage) and the white meat. The red meat you don’t want from a catfish because it stores all the bad stuff from the water.

Flathead Catfish

Flathead Catfish

Leave the skin attached just fillet the white meat off the skin. I like this way, especially on a big catfish – the size of the catfish keeps the fish from sliding around. (on a wooden cutting board) White meat should be one piece when finished.

Flathead Catfish

Flathead Catfish

That’s it,  repeat for the other side and any remaining fishes.

TIP: The ribcage doesn’t go back to the tail (duh – lol) so when you get to the back of the ribcage – put your thumb against the ribcage moving it back toward the fin following the knife in your other hand – you can feel where you need to put your knife to continue the bottom 1/2 of the tail area. Doing this will keep the meat in 1 piece instead of two.
Fresh catfish for dinner tonight !!!

Catfish Night Fishing

Catfish Night Fishing

 

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Presidential Canna Lily – first blooms (Ron Paul 2012) Ha Ha

Presidential Canna Lily

Presidential Canna Lily

While I was out in the yard early this afternoon snooping around all the new growth, I took pictures  of my new blooms.

This here flower above is a Presidential Canna, grows 7-8 feet tall and has huge green leaves. (this picture is missing a Ron Paul sign, I know .. Ha Ha) When the Canna’s in the back bloom I’ll get a picture .. that picture will have the Ron Paul sign in the backround.

I really like these plants because every morning they water themselves and everything else around them. The dew collects on the leaves like you wouldn’t believe and for the first hours of early morning the water just drips off them.

I have these plants everywhere because they water alot of the other plants every morning. The only down side about the Canna is I must dig them up every year before frost. When I dig them up, there is 3 times as much as I put in the ground … I give alot away to neighbors and anyone who wants some. LOL

Below is a picture of some Presidential Canna’s and in the back ground you can see one of the straggler tomato plants I was talking about in a previous post. Those Stragglers just show up is some of the strangest places. This straggler is growing pretty good it’s already well above the fence. No tomatoes yet though.

Presidential Canna Lily

Presidential Canna Lily

 

I have a yellow Trumpet Vine also, this vine plant has been blooming for weeks now – I figure I take a picture anyhows. In the evenings I like to sit out and drink a cup of coffee or tea and watch the hummingbirds. I have 2 that pal around and show up once in a while. I still like to sit out and wait to see if they show up. I do have one of those hummingbird feeders in another area of the back yard, but, I’ve never seen a hummingbird at it – they love these Trumpet Vine flowers though.

Yellow Trumpet Vine

Yellow Trumpet Vine

 

Can’t end this post without showing you some vegetables (garden onion, red beets, sweet pepper and egg plant) .. I picked and dug up these cute eats this afternoon too, so for diner I made roasted pork loin, mashed potatoes, a stir fry with some of the veggies you see below and of course, pie. Peach pie from the peaches one of the neighbors brought over. I made 2 pies and sent the neighbor one as a thank you for the peaches.  ;o)

Garden Vegetables

Garden Vegetables

 

 

I see some color on my tomato plants – first of the season – WOOT WOOT

Tomato Plant

Tomato Plant

Early this afternoon I went out to check on my tomato plants and wouldn’t ya know – I see some orange and red !!! First sign of color on my tomato plants this year.

Now that I have 2 rabbits, I’ve been using their droppings for fertilizer along with a tea/coffee soup mix from once used morning tea bag and coffee grounds. I cannot believe how tall my tomato plants are getting. Some are easy 9 feet tall so far and I can’t even get the whole plant in a picture. Below is a picture of a some of the plants. I’ll show the stragglers in another post.

The 14 tomato plants I do have come up every year, I never have to buy tomato plants, unless, I want a different variety of course.

About 8 years ago I bought 3 Ponderosa Beefmasters and 2 Tommy Toes. They grew to have a few nice tomatoes the first year .. I believe I canned 3 jars of stewed tomatoes that year and plenty of table tomatoes. I planted them 2 feet apart in a row.

Tomato Plant

Tomato Plant

The following year, those same plants came up again, along with a few straggler plants, growing taller with more harvest. 8 years later I have 14 tomato plants and about a dozen straggler plants. The straggler plants are always cherry tomatoes. The straggler plants die every year but they give me heaps and heaps of cherry tomatoes and last well into late Fall. My permanent resident tomatoes don’t die off till the first frost.
The interesting thing about these 14 tomato plants is they give me both large – medium – small and cherry tomatoes on the same plant. There is usually a bunch of 9-12 tomatoes and one or two Beefmaster type and the rest get smaller with the smallest (not even really small) being the cherry tomato. The cherry tomatoes always show color and get harvested first. I didn’t think it to be possible. But, I love my tomato plants. Ha Ha

 

My response from Senator Pat Toomey on the Uniform Protection and Safety Act S.707

Dear Ms. Kirst,

Thank you for contacting me about the Puppy Uniform Protection and Safety Act (S. 707). I appreciate hearing from you.

As you may know, Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL) introduced S. 707 on March 31, 2011. Among its provisions, S. 707 would allow the United States Department of Agriculture to regulate any dog breeder that sells more than 50 dogs as pets in any one-year period.

Currently, this bill is pending before the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry, of which I am not a member. Please be assured that I will keep your thoughts in mind should this legislation come before me in the full senate.

Thank you again for your correspondence. Please do not hesitate to contact me in the future if I can be of assistance.

Sincerely,

Signature

Pat Toomey
U.S. Senator, Pennsylvania

My response from Senator Pat Toomey about the Federal Reserve Transparency Act

Dear Ms. Kirst,

Thank you for contacting me about your support for the Federal Reserve Transparency Act of 2011 (S. 202). I appreciate hearing from you.

As you know, Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) introduced S. 202 on January 26, 2011. This measure would require a full audit of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the Federal Reserve banks by the Comptroller General of the United States before the end of 2012. As a co-sponsor of S. 202 and someone who has been critical of some of the Federal Reserve’s actions, I value your input on ways to provide additional scrutiny on our nation’s central bank.

Currently, S. 202 is pending before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, and I am hopeful that it will become law. Please be assured that I will keep your thoughts in mind as Congress continues to review this legislation.

Thank you again for your correspondence. Please do not hesitate to contact me in the future if I can be of assistance.

Sincerely,

Signature

Pat Toomey
U.S. Senator, Pennsylvania

My response from Senator Robert Casey on Affordable Care Act

Dear Ms. Kirst:

Thank you for taking the time to contact me about the Affordable Care Act. I appreciate hearing from you about this issue.

In the two years since the Affordable Care Act became law, the debate over the merits of the law have continued, despite the recent decision by the Supreme Court to uphold most key provisions. I believe that this law reflects our Nation’s commitment to ensuring health care for all Americans. Over the next several years, the Affordable Care Act will extend health insurance coverage to an additional 30 million Americans, ensuring that 95 percent of our Nation has access to quality, affordable care.

Pennsylvanians are already benefiting from many of the provisions of the Affordable Care Act. As of April 2012, 5,355 Pennsylvanians with pre-existing medical conditions have enrolled in PA Fair Care, the high-risk insurance plan created and funded by the Affordable Care Act. Almost 300 employers in Pennsylvania have enrolled in the Early Retiree Reinsurance Program, making it easier for them to continue offering health insurance to their early retirees who are too young to enroll in Medicare. Over 91,000 young adults now qualify to remain on their parents’ insurance until they turn 26, providing a viable option to many young adults who would not otherwise have access to affordable health insurance.

I do not support efforts to repeal or defund the Affordable Care Act, and I oppose any efforts to do so. Repealing or defunding the Affordable Care Act would be a big step backwards for too many Pennsylvania families, removing new consumer protections that are already benefiting thousands of Pennsylvanians. These protections will protect Americans from losing their health insurance when they get sick or change jobs, and will prohibit insurance companies from discriminating against individuals based on their medical history or health status, gender or salary.

I respect the many people who remain opposed to the Affordable Care Act. In the many months I spent working on this issue, talking both to Pennsylvanians who supported the law and those who opposed it, I concluded that the cost of doing nothing was too high for too many working families, and that this legislation will provide families with security and peace of mind, knowing that they will have access to the health care they need. At the same time, I recognize that the law Affordable Care Act is not perfect and that more work remains to be done; I am open to reasonable proposals to improve the Affordable Care Act.

There are many rumors and much misinformation about what the Affordable Care Act does or does not do. To learn more about what the Affordable Care Act means for Pennsylvania and for you, I encourage you to visit http://www.healthcare.gov to learn about the specific provisions in the law and how the legislation is being implemented. If you have further questions about how you and your family will be affected by this legislation, please do not hesitate to contact my office; my staff will be happy to assist you.

Again, thank you for sharing your thoughts with me. Please do not hesitate to contact me in the future about this or any other matter of importance to you.

For more information on this or other issues, I encourage you to visit my website, http://casey.senate.gov. I hope you will find this online office a comprehensive resource to stay up-to-date on my work in Washington, request assistance from my office or share with me your thoughts on the issues that matter most to you and to Pennsylvania.

Sincerely,
Bob Casey
United States Senator

P.S. If you would like to respond to this message, please use the contact form on my website: http://casey.senate.gov/contact/

My responce from Senator Bob Casey on Supreme Court Ruling

Dear Ms. Kirst:

Thank you for taking the time to contact me about the Supreme Court’s recent decision on the Affordable Care Act. I appreciate hearing from you about this issue.

On June 28, 2012, the Supreme Court ruled in the case of National Federation of Independent Business et al. v. Sebelius, Secretary of Health and Human Services, et al. This decision upheld most of the key provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

As a result of this ruling, countless Pennsylvanians will be able to secure affordable health coverage in the coming years. Provisions of the law that are already improving access to quality health insurance will remain in effect, such as the provision allowing the 91,000 young adults in Pennsylvania on their parents’ health insurance to keep that coverage and the provision that has provided discounted drugs provided to 240,000 older Pennsylvanians on Medicare who have fallen into the “donut hole.” Starting in 2014, health insurance companies will be prohibited from discriminating against or denying coverage altogether to the millions of Americans with pre-existing conditions such as asthma, diabetes or heart disease. This will ensure that they have access to the health insurance they need to manage their conditions and stay healthy.

One of the key provisions upheld in the ruling was the requirement that individuals who can afford health insurance, but choose to let others bear the burden of their health care costs, be assessed a penalty. The Supreme Court rejected the argument that the individual responsibility requirement was constitutional under the “Commerce Clause,” finding instead that this “free rider” penalty is constitutional. However, the Court found that the individual responsibility requirement was not prohibited by the Anti-Injunction Act, which would have prevented the Court from ruling on the constitutionality of this penalty until after it had been applied.

Health insurance is a shared responsibility among individuals, employers and the federal government. Individuals will be responsible for purchasing health insurance, employers will be responsible for providing health insurance and the federal government will ensure that all Americans can afford health insurance. The requirement to purchase health insurance takes effect in 2014 and individuals will only be penalized if they have access to affordable health insurance, but instead choose not to obtain it. The average Pennsylvania family pays an additional $900 per year in health insurance premiums to cover the health care costs incurred by uninsured individuals, and the modest penalties in the Affordable Care Act will help encourage people to enroll in health insurance. About 99 percent of Americans would either be exempt from the requirement to purchase health insurance — because they have employer-sponsored coverage or public health insurance, or because they are low-income — or they would be given subsidies in the form of a premium assistance tax credit to help them purchase affordable health insurance through the new health insurance exchanges.

Section 1312 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act expressly prohibits noncitizens from participating in health plans sold in the health insurance exchanges that will be established in 2014. Since these individuals will be prohibited from purchasing health insurance through the exchanges, they will also be unable to apply for or receive the premium assistance tax credits that will be available to low-income individuals. On the other hand, Members of Congress who choose to enroll in the health insurance offered to federal employees will be required to select one of the plans offered through the exchanges; they are not excluded from the requirements of the Affordable Care Act.

The Affordable Care Act also included language that I helped to strengthen during the Senate debate on the bill, which creates a religious exemption to the individual responsibility requirements. My amendment clarified the religious conscience exception in the law so that members of a recognized religious sect with tenets that reject insurance would be exempt from the insurance mandate. The amendment expanded the definition to include self-employed individuals, employees of employers who qualify for the exemption, and employers of employees who qualify for the exemption. This would apply to groups such as the Amish and members of health care sharing ministries.

I do not support efforts to repeal or defund the Affordable Care Act, and I oppose any efforts to do so. While I respect the many people who remain opposed to the Affordable Care Act, after many months I spent working on this issue and talking both to Pennsylvanians who supported the law and those who opposed it, I concluded that the cost of doing nothing was too high for too many working families. I believe this legislation will provide families with security and peace of mind, knowing that they will have access to the health care they need. At the same time, I recognize that the Affordable Care Act is not perfect and that more work remains to be done; I am open to reasonable proposals to improve the Affordable Care Act, and I believe that Democrats and Republicans must commit to working together to continue to improve the law.

Again, thank you for sharing your thoughts with me. Please do not hesitate to contact me in the future about this or any other matter of importance to you.

For more information on this or other issues, I encourage you to visit my website, http://casey.senate.gov. I hope you will find this online office a comprehensive resource to stay up-to-date on my work in Washington, request assistance from my office or share with me your thoughts on the issues that matter most to you and to Pennsylvania.

Sincerely,
Bob Casey
United States Senator

P.S. If you would like to respond to this message, please use the contact form on my website: http://casey.senate.gov/contact/